Jekyll & Hyde bread…

Jekyll & Hyde bread…

Submitted by Reynard on July 17, 2015 – 2:57pm.

With my Pain de Campagne, it’s two steps forward, one step back – and probably three sideways as well… Every time I seem to solve one problem, something else goes wrong… I’m gradually improving it each time I bake, but I wouldn’t mind some feedback from those of you wiser than I…

The recipe I used today is as follows:

450g strong bread flour

30g wholemeal bread flour

1 1/2 tsp sea salt

200g starter @ 100% hydration

275g tepid water

After Wednesday’s frisbee that stuck royally to the banneton, I made a few small changes to today’s bake. I reduced the hydration to 65% from the original 70-plus and I swapped the Leckford Estate strong bread flour to the Waitrose Canadian & very strong bread flour. Those were intentional. The unintentional change was swapping my white starter for my whole rye starter as the latter was threatening to escape its jar…

Made the dough as per usual, kneading by hand for around 10 mins or so until the dough was nice, smooth and elastic. At 65% hydration it was much, much easier to handle. Put in a couple of stretch & folds during the five hour bulk ferment at room temperature – that’s around 22C (71F) here. Degassed, shaped into a boule, then into the floured banneton it went for the proof, which I always do in a plastic bag.

At around the 2 hour mark, the loaf looked to be about 80% of double, so was about 85-90% by the time the oven was up to temperature. Onto the greased baking sheet it went, no sticking to the banneton at all this time. The dough spread a bit, but it wasn’t a splat like Wednesday’s attempt. Quickly scored it and popped it into the oven.

Bake time was 45 minutes in total, 5 mins at 230, and 40 minutes at 190. Oven spring was absolutely insane, the best I’ve ever had, but…

From one side, the bread looked very presentable indeed…

But from the diametrically opposite side it had developed a bit of an issue…

And the bottom looked a bit… ragged…

Sorry, no crumb shot yet… That will have to wait till tomorrow lunchtime I’m afraid. But is this wonky Jekyll & Hyde loaf down to underproofing, shaping, my dodgy scoring or a combination of all three? I used the method for shaping boules that’s in the handbook. Also, it was the first time I’d tried out this particular scoring pattern, I usually just do a cross on the top of the loaf, but was feeling adventurous… Any thoughts?

It smells great though, and has a lovely crisp crust. Can’t wait to tuck in 🙂

 

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